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The development of prospective memory in young schoolchildren: The impact of ongoing task absorption, cue salience, and cue centrality

Published inJournal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 116, no. 4, p. 792-810
Publication date2013
Abstract

This study presents evidence that 9- and 10-year-old children outperform 6- and 7-year-old children on a measure of event-based prospective memory and that retrieval-based factors systematically influence performance and age differences. All experiments revealed significant age effects in prospective memory even after controlling for ongoing task performance. In addition, the provision of a less absorbing ongoing task (Experiment 1), higher cue salience (Experiment 2), and cues appearing in the center of attention (Experiment 3) were each associated with better performance. Of particular developmental importance was an age by cue centrality (in or outside of the center of attention) interaction that emerged in Experiment 3. Thus, age effects were restricted to prospective memory cues appearing outside of the center of attention, suggesting that the development of prospective memory across early school years may be modulated by whether a cue requires overt monitoring beyond the immediate attentional context. Because whether a cue is in or outside of the center of attention might determine the amount of executive control needed in a prospective memory task, findings suggest that developing executive control resources may drive prospective memory development across primary school age.

Citation (ISO format)
KLIEGEL, Matthias et al. The development of prospective memory in young schoolchildren: The impact of ongoing task absorption, cue salience, and cue centrality. In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2013, vol. 116, n° 4, p. 792–810. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.07.012
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ISSN of the journal0022-0965
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