en
Master
English

Improving interpreting for international disaster-zone relief efforts: creation of the Rapid Response: Humanitarian Interpreting self-study eLearning module

Master program titleMaîtrise universitaire en interprétation de conférence
Defense date2016
Abstract

The “Rapid Response: Humanitarian Interpreting” project was conceived against the backdrop of the critical interpreting training needs for scores of local nationals recruited by international relief organizations to serve as humanitarian interpreters in the wake of natural disasters. Without any introduction to interpreting and the basic skills sets, as well as the cultural, ethical, and psychosocial aspects it entails, these recruits are expected to interpret competently for relief workers, survivors, and other stakeholders. To provide - as a rapid training response within these still acute emergency contexts - at least a short, basic orientation to interpreting on the massive scale required, such a course would have to be made available in an easily accessible and distributable, user- and learner-friendly, compact, and effective form. This thesis describes how the authors established the precise contours of this need and proceeded to create a one-hour, on-demand, exclusively self-study eLearning module to help meet it.

eng
Keywords
  • Humanitarian interpreting
  • Ethics principles
  • Psychosocial care
  • eLearning
  • Empowerment
  • Higher education in emergency settings
Citation (ISO format)
DELAHAYES, Barbara, GIBBS, Jonathan, SEBASTIANI, Emanuela. Improving interpreting for international disaster-zone relief efforts: creation of the Rapid Response: Humanitarian Interpreting self-study eLearning module. 2016.
Main files (1)
Master thesis
accessLevelPrivate
Identifiers
  • PID : unige:88097
283views
103downloads

Technical informations

Creation10/10/2016 11:14:00 AM
First validation10/10/2016 11:14:00 AM
Update time03/15/2023 12:48:57 AM
Status update03/15/2023 12:48:56 AM
Last indexation01/29/2024 8:51:13 PM
All rights reserved by Archive ouverte UNIGE and the University of GenevaunigeBlack