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Scientific article
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A nap to recap or how reward regulates hippocampal-prefrontal memory networks during daytime sleep in humans

Published ineLife, vol. 4
Publication date2015
Abstract

Sleep plays a crucial role in the consolidation of newly acquired memories. Yet, how our brain selects the noteworthy information that will be consolidated during sleep remains largely unknown. Here we show that post-learning sleep favors the selectivity of long-term consolidation: when tested three months after initial encoding, the most important (i.e., rewarded, strongly encoded) memories are better retained, and also remembered with higher subjective confidence. Our brain imaging data reveals that the functional interplay between dopaminergic reward regions, the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus contributes to the integration of rewarded associative memories. We further show that sleep spindles strengthen memory representations based on reward values, suggesting a privileged replay of information yielding positive outcomes. These findings demonstrate that post-learning sleep determines the neural fate of motivationally-relevant memories and promotes a value-based stratification of long-term memory stores.

Keywords
  • Human
  • Neuroscience
  • Memory
  • Hippocampus
Funding
Citation (ISO format)
IGLOI, Kinga Katinka et al. A nap to recap or how reward regulates hippocampal-prefrontal memory networks during daytime sleep in humans. In: eLife, 2015, vol. 4. doi: 10.7554/eLife.07903
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Article (Published version)
accessLevelPublic
Identifiers
ISSN of the journal2050-084X
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Technical informations

Creation11/09/2015 1:41:00 PM
First validation11/09/2015 1:41:00 PM
Update time03/15/2023 12:04:05 AM
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