en
Scientific article
English

Attachment orientations in business-to-business relationships

ContributorsPaulssen, Marcel
Published inPsychology & marketing, vol. 26, no. 6, p. 507-533
Publication date2009
Abstract

Attachment theory has produced an impressive body of evidence for explaining individual differences in personal relationship behavior. The current study examines whether attachment theory can be fruitfully extended to business-to-business relationships. Hypotheses about the impact of personal attachment orientations on key relationship constructs are developed and empirically tested in two business-to-business relationships. Customers who are securely attached in their personal relationships with their romantic partners experience higher levels of satisfaction, trust, and repurchase intent in their business-to-business relationships. In addition, an attachment scale that is specifically tailored for a business-to-business context is developed. Two dimensions of business attachment are empirically derived: secure business attachment measures the ability and willingness to rely on the business partner, and close business attachment measures the desire to develop personal bonds with a business partner or its employees. The two business attachment dimensions can be used to segment customers with respect to their intrinsic retainability and their preference for personal bonding with their business partners.

Keywords
  • Attachment style
  • Trust
  • Repurchase intent
  • Satisfaction
Citation (ISO format)
PAULSSEN, Marcel. Attachment orientations in business-to-business relationships. In: Psychology & marketing, 2009, vol. 26, n° 6, p. 507–533. doi: 10.1002/mar.20285
Main files (1)
Article (Accepted version)
accessLevelRestricted
Identifiers
ISSN of the journal0742-6046
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