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Scientific article
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English

Usability Testing and Technology Acceptance of an mHealth App at the Point of Care During Simulated Pediatric In- and Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitations: Study Nested Within 2 Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trials

Published inJMIR human factors, vol. 9, no. 1, e35399
Publication date2022-03-01
First online date2022-03-01
Abstract

Background: Mobile apps are increasingly being used in various domains of medicine. Few are evidence-based, and their benefits can only be achieved if end users intend to adopt and use them. To date, only a small fraction of mobile apps have published data on their field usability and end user acceptance results, especially in emergency medicine.

Objective: This study aims to determine the usability and acceptance of an evidence-based mobile app while safely preparing emergency drugs at the point of care during pediatric in- and out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitations by frontline caregivers.

Methods: In 2 multicenter randomized controlled parent trials conducted at 6 pediatric emergency departments from March 1 to December 31, 2017, and 14 emergency medical services from September 3, 2019, to January 21, 2020, the usability and technology acceptance of the PedAMINES (Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations) app were evaluated among skilled pediatric emergency nurses and advanced paramedics when preparing continuous infusions of vasoactive drugs and direct intravenous emergency drugs at pediatric dosages during standardized, simulation-based, pediatric in- and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest scenarios, respectively. Usability was measured using the 10-item System Usability Scale. A 26-item technology acceptance self-administered survey (5-point Likert-type scales), adapted from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model, was used to measure app acceptance and intention to use.

Results: All 100% (128/128) of nurses (crossover trial) and 49.3% (74/150) of paramedics (parallel trial) were assigned to the mobile app. Mean total scores on the System Usability Scale were excellent and reached 89.5 (SD 8.8; 95% CI 88.0-91.1) for nurses and 89.7 (SD 8.7; 95% CI 87.7-91.7) for paramedics. Acceptance of the technology was very good and rated on average >4.5/5 for 5 of the 8 independent constructs evaluated. Only the image construct scored between 3.2 and 3.5 by both participant populations.

Conclusions: The results provide evidence that dedicated mobile apps can be easy to use and highly accepted at the point of care during in- and out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitations by frontline emergency caregivers. These findings can contribute to the implementation and valorization of studies aimed at evaluating the usability and acceptance of mobile apps in the field by caregivers, even in critical situations.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03021122; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03921346.

International registered report identifier (irrid): RR2-10.1186/s13063-019-3726-4.

eng
Keywords
  • System Usability Scale
  • Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Drugs
  • Emergency medical services
  • Medication errors
  • Mobile apps
  • Mobile health
  • Mobile phone
  • Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
  • Paramedics
  • Pediatrics
  • Smartphone
Citation (ISO format)
SIEBERT, Johan et al. Usability Testing and Technology Acceptance of an mHealth App at the Point of Care During Simulated Pediatric In- and Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitations: Study Nested Within 2 Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trials. In: JMIR human factors, 2022, vol. 9, n° 1, p. e35399. doi: 10.2196/35399
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ISSN of the journal2292-9495
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Technical informations

Creation10/06/2022 12:48:00 PM
First validation10/06/2022 12:48:00 PM
Update time03/16/2023 10:51:33 AM
Status update03/16/2023 10:51:30 AM
Last indexation02/01/2024 9:40:30 AM
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