en
Scientific article
Letter
Open access
English

COVID-19 Symptoms: Longitudinal Evolution and Persistence in Outpatient Settings

Published inAnnals of Internal Medicine, vol. 174, no. 5, p. 723-725
Publication date2020
Abstract

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread, causing a worldwide pandemic, and prolonged effects are emerging (1, 2). The term “long COVID” describes illness in persons who continue to report lasting effects after infection (3, 4). To date, little information exists about outpatient settings in this novel disease where 81% of cases are reportedly on the mild end of the spectrum (5). Informing patients and physicians about COVID-19 symptom evolution may help them recognize the time course of the disease, legitimize patients' concerns, and reassure them when possible. Messages around potentially persisting symptoms could also assist in reinforcing public health measures to avoid the spread of infection. Objective: To describe COVID-19 symptom evolution and persistence in an outpatient setting in Geneva, Switzerland, from day 1 through day 30 to 45 after diagnosis.

Keywords
  • Adult
  • Ambulatory Care
  • COVID-19 / diagnosis
  • COVID-19 / epidemiology
  • Disease Progression
  • Female
  • Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pandemics
  • Pneumonia, Viral / diagnosis
  • Pneumonia, Viral / epidemiology
  • Pneumonia, Viral / virology
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Self Report
  • Switzerland / epidemiology
Citation (ISO format)
NEHME, Mayssam et al. COVID-19 Symptoms: Longitudinal Evolution and Persistence in Outpatient Settings. In: Annals of Internal Medicine, 2020, vol. 174, n° 5, p. 723–725. doi: 10.7326/M20-5926
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Article (Published version)
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Identifiers
ISSN of the journal0003-4819
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Technical informations

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