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Doctoral thesis
Open access
English

The burden of normality: a model of psychosocial adjustment after deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

ContributorsBaertschi, Marc
Defense date2018-12-11
Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a leading surgical treatment for patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) whose response to traditional dopaminergic medication is no longer optimal. Despite significant motor improvement, patients undergoing DBS for PD (PD-DBS) continue facing various issues impairing their quality of life (e.g., maintain of non-motor symptoms, appearance of new symptoms, difficulties to find adapted stimulation parameters). In addition to these medical reasons, psychosocial maladjustment has been recently considered a potential cause for perceived dissatisfaction after PD-DBS. Yet, no theoretical model has been proposed so far to account for the role and dynamics of psychosocial adjustment in the DBS process. This thesis attempts to apply to PD-DBS a theoretical model of psychosocial adjustment, the burden of normality (BoN), initially developed in epilepsy. Five studies are presented in this regard. The BoN is directly addressed through two studies; first, a literature review on the possible correspondences between the model and psychosocial issues after PD-DBS and; second; a retrospective and qualitative study investigating the psychosocial experience of patients treated with PD-DBS. Next, two potential issues of psychosocial adjustment after PD-DBS, namely couple satisfaction and illness representations, are investigated throughout three studies. By way of conclusion, this thesis discusses the relevance of setting up psychosocial rehabilitation programs in the clinical routine.

eng
Keywords
  • Burden of normality
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Couple satisfaction
  • Illness representations
Citation (ISO format)
BAERTSCHI, Marc. The burden of normality: a model of psychosocial adjustment after deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease. 2018. doi: 10.13097/archive-ouverte/unige:112573
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Creation12/25/2018 9:31:00 AM
First validation12/25/2018 9:31:00 AM
Update time03/15/2023 3:19:58 PM
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