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Cutting Edge Chemical Biology: Report from the 2016 International Symposium on Chemical Biology, January 13–15, Geneva, Switzerland

Published inACS chemical biology, vol. 11, no. 4, p. 816-820
Publication date2016
Abstract

The 2016 International Symposium on Chemical Biology was organized by the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Chemical Biology. The NCCR Chemical Biology is located at the University of Geneva (UniGE; Director: Prof. Howard Riezman) and the Ecole Polytechnique Fedé rale de Lausanne (EPFL; Co-director: Prof. ́ Kai Johnsson). The symposium was held on January 13−15, 2016 at the Campus Biotech, a new center for biotechnology and life science research that was formed through a unique partnership between the University of Geneva and EPFL and is located within walking distance from the city center of Geneva. This exciting scientific venue attracted more than 240 attendees from around the world. With the aim of providing a sound overview of key challenges in cutting edge chemical biology, as well as fostering an open dialogue with networking opportunities, the organizing committee selected 15 plenary lectures with diverse scope under the broad subject of chemical biology. The scientific program was rounded up by four poster sessions with over 60 posters.

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ADIBEKIAN, Alexander, STALLFORTH, Pierre. Cutting Edge Chemical Biology: Report from the 2016 International Symposium on Chemical Biology, January 13–15, Geneva, Switzerland. In: ACS chemical biology, 2016, vol. 11, n° 4, p. 816–820. doi: 10.1021/acschembio.6b00267
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ISSN of the journal1554-8929
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