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Scientific article
English

Invasive zygomycosis in transplant recipients

Published inClinical transplantation, vol. 21, no. 4, p. 577-582
Publication date2007
Abstract

Zygomycosis are rare fungal infections occurring mainly in immunocompromised patients. To date only 160 cases have been published in transplant recipients. We report four new cases of zygomycosis in transplant recipients illustrating the large clinical spectrum of this infection: one disseminated infection with heart involvement and one rhinocerebral infection with dissemination in two Bone Marrow Transplantation recipients, one cutaneous infection in a liver and one pulmonary infection in a kidney recipient. All cases, except the cutaneous infection that was accessible to surgical resection and a systemic antifungal treatment, were fatal. In transplant recipients cumulating risk factors for zygomycosis, a high index of suspicion is required. Early diagnosis and combining surgery with systemic amphotericin-B are mandatory to improve survival rates.

Keywords
  • Adult
  • Amphotericin B/therapeutic use
  • Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
  • Bone Marrow Transplantationation
  • Female
  • Heart Transplantation
  • Humans
  • Immunocompromised Host
  • Liver Transplantation
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mucormycosis
  • Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis/drug therapy/ microbiology
  • Postoperative Complications/ microbiology
  • Rhizopus
  • Zygomycosis/ drug therapy/etiology
Citation (ISO format)
UCKAY, Ilker et al. Invasive zygomycosis in transplant recipients. In: Clinical transplantation, 2007, vol. 21, n° 4, p. 577–582. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00684.x
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ISSN of the journal0902-0063
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