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Title

Susceptibility to fraud in systematic reviews: lessons from the Reuben case

Authors
Marret, Emmanuel
Dahl, Jorgen B.
McQuay, Henry J.
Moiniche, Steen
Moore, R Andrew
Straube, Sebastian
Published in Anesthesiology. 2009, vol. 111, no. 6, p. 1279-1289
Abstract BACKGROUND: Dr. Scott Reuben allegedly fabricated data. The authors of the current article examined the impact of Reuben reports on conclusions of systematic reviews. METHODS: The authors searched in ISI Web of Knowledge systematic reviews citing Reuben reports. Systematic reviews were grouped into one of three categories: I, only cited but did not include Reuben reports; II, retrieved and considered, but eventually excluded Reuben reports; III, included Reuben reports. For quantitative systematic reviews (i.e., meta-analyses), a relevant difference was defined as a significant result becoming nonsignificant (or vice versa) by excluding Reuben reports. For qualitative systematic reviews, each author decided independently whether noninclusion of Reuben reports would have changed conclusions. RESULTS: Twenty-five systematic reviews (5 category I, 6 category II, 14 category III) cited 27 Reuben reports (published 1994-2007). Most tested analgesics in surgical patients. One of 6 quantitative category III reviews would have reached different conclusions without Reuben reports. In all 6 (30 subgroup analyses involving Reuben reports), exclusion of Reuben reports never made any difference when the number of patients from Reuben reports was less than 30% of all patients included in the analysis. Of 8 qualitative category III reviews, all authors agreed that one would certainly have reached different conclusions without Reuben reports. For another 4, the authors' judgment was not unanimous. CONCLUSIONS: Carefully performed systematic reviews proved robust against the impact of Reuben reports. Quantitative systematic reviews were vulnerable if the fraudulent data were more than 30% of the total. Qualitative systematic reviews seemed at greater risk than quantitative.
Keywords Analgesics/adverse effects/therapeutic useCyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/adverse effects/therapeutic useHumans*Meta-Analysis as TopicPain, Postoperative/drug therapyRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic*Review Literature as Topic*Scientific MisconductTreatment Outcome
Identifiers
PMID: 19934873
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Research group La Médecine Périopératoire et l'anesthésie (70)
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MARRET, Emmanuel et al. Susceptibility to fraud in systematic reviews: lessons from the Reuben case. In: Anesthesiology, 2009, vol. 111, n° 6, p. 1279-1289. https://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:19942

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Deposited on : 2012-04-23

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