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Master
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An investigation of perceptual differences of an adult population with various levels of parental experience, regarding non-verbal signals emitted by full-term and premature newborns

Number of pages129
Master program titleMaitrise universitaire en psychologie
Defense date2024-02-05
Abstract

This study explores the nuanced judgment of comfort and discomfort in newborns across gestational ages (premature vs full-term newborns), as perceived by different populations, namely between different parental groups and non-parents. We investigated the influence of parental experience on this recognition and the effects of anxiety and depression. Results show that while comfort is accurately assessed, discomfort presents harder challenges, notably for premature infants. Parental experience inconsistently influences judgment accuracy, with hospitalized parents of premature newborns demonstrating superior recognition abilities. The study also reveals heightened vulnerability to anxiety and depression among this population compared to those with full-term pregnancies. Moreover, anxiety and depression influence perceptions of newborn comfort and discomfort. The findings underscore the complexity of emotional dynamics in the neonatology intensive care units (NICU), emphasizing the need for comprehensive interventions for parents.

eng
Keywords
  • Newborns
  • Affective states
  • Prematurity
  • Non-verbal signals
  • Perception
  • Comfort
  • Discomfort
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
Citation (ISO format)
GARCIA HERRERO, Neus. An investigation of perceptual differences of an adult population with various levels of parental experience, regarding non-verbal signals emitted by full-term and premature newborns. 2024.
Main files (1)
Master thesis
accessLevelRestricted
Identifiers
  • PID : unige:175663
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Technical informations

Creation02/05/2024 4:44:01 PM
First validation03/15/2024 5:06:12 PM
Update time03/15/2024 5:06:12 PM
Status update03/15/2024 5:06:12 PM
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