en
Doctoral thesis
English

Intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development during embryogenesis

ContributorsPetzold, Timorcid
Number of pages326
Imprimatur date2023-12-01
Defense date2023-12-01
Abstract

Haematopoiesis is the process by which blood cells are continuously replenished during the course of an organism’s lifetime. Definitive haematopoiesis involves the production of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). HSPCs sustain blood production in all vertebrates. HSPCs are specified from the dorsal aorta during embryonic development, through a process known as endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT). Following HSPC specification from the aorta, HSPCs migrate to a subsequent niche, where they receive highly regulated signals from the microenvironment, allowing them to expand. Gaining a deeper understanding of the molecular cues required for HSPC specification and expansion in the vertebrate embryo, may allow translation of these principles into improved success of in vitro generation and ex vivo expansion of HSPCs. Therefore, this holds great promise for regenerative medicine, including gene therapy. In my thesis, I investigated molecular players involved in HSPC specification and expansion, predominantly using the zebrafish embryo as a model system.

eng
Citation (ISO format)
PETZOLD, Tim. Intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development during embryogenesis. 2023. doi: 10.13097/archive-ouverte/unige:174068
Main files (1)
Thesis
accessLevelPrivateaccessLevelPublic 01/02/2026
Secondary files (1)
Identifiers
86views
1downloads

Technical informations

Creation01/04/2024 8:18:34 PM
First validation01/08/2024 10:33:26 AM
Update time01/08/2024 10:33:26 AM
Status update01/08/2024 10:33:26 AM
Last indexation05/06/2024 5:42:39 PM
All rights reserved by Archive ouverte UNIGE and the University of GenevaunigeBlack