en
Scientific article
Open access
English

Beyond personal empathy: perceiving inclusive empathy as socially shared predicts support for transitional justice mechanisms

Published inAffective Science, vol. 2, no. 4, p. 402-413
Publication date2021-12-02
First online date2021-12-02
Abstract

In countries emerging from civil war, inclusive empathy is important for conflict resolution yet may be difficult to promote. Widening the predominant focus on personal inclusive empathy for conflict resolution, we examine whether support for transitional justice mechanisms (TJ) can be predicted by how much an individual perceives inclusive empathy as being shared in their local communities. Our results, based on a probability sample survey in post-war Sri Lanka ( N = 580), reveal that the effects of this perceived communal inclusive empathy can be distinguished from those of personally experienced inclusive empathy, and that the more respondents perceive inclusive empathy as prevalent in their communities, the more they support TJ mechanisms. However, the results also indicate the contextual limits of perceived communal inclusive empathy as a resource for conflict resolution: participants tend to underestimate the prevalence of inclusive empathy, especially in militarized minority communities, and the more they underestimate it, the less they support TJ mechanisms. This study corroborates the importance of social influence in conflict resolution, suggesting that perception of inclusive empathy as shared in one's community is a key determinant of popular support for conflict-transforming policies.

eng
Research group
Citation (ISO format)
PENIC, Sandra et al. Beyond personal empathy: perceiving inclusive empathy as socially shared predicts support for transitional justice mechanisms. In: Affective Science, 2021, vol. 2, n° 4, p. 402–413. doi: 10.1007/s42761-021-00086-2
Main files (1)
Article (Published version)
Identifiers
ISSN of the journal2662-2041
186views
55downloads

Technical informations

Creation12/16/2021 8:51:00 AM
First validation12/16/2021 8:51:00 AM
Update time03/16/2023 2:37:24 AM
Status update03/16/2023 2:37:23 AM
Last indexation05/06/2024 9:43:59 AM
All rights reserved by Archive ouverte UNIGE and the University of GenevaunigeBlack