en
Scientific article
Open access
English

Mutated nicotinic receptors responsible for autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy are more sensitive to carbamazepine

Published inEpilepsia, vol. 40, no. 9, p. 1198-1209
Publication date1999-09
Abstract

The recent linkage between a genetically transmissible form of epilepsy (ADNFLE) and mutations within the alpha4 subunit, one component of the major brain neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), raises the question of the role of this receptor in epileptogenesis. Although acting by different mechanisms, the two genetic alterations so far identified both render the nAChR less efficient. In view of the high sensitivity of ADNFLE to carbamazepine (CBZ), we studied the effects of this drug and of valproate (VPA) on the human alpha4beta2 nAChR and its mutations.

eng
Keywords
  • Animals
  • Anticonvulsants / pharmacology
  • Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use
  • Carbamazepine / pharmacology
  • Carbamazepine / therapeutic use
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Epilepsy, Frontal Lobe / drug therapy
  • Epilepsy, Frontal Lobe / genetics
  • Evoked Potentials / drug effects
  • Humans
  • Mutation
  • Oocytes / drug effects
  • Oocytes / metabolism
  • Patch-Clamp Techniques
  • Polymorphism, Genetic
  • Receptors, Nicotinic / drug effects
  • Receptors, Nicotinic / genetics
  • Valproic Acid / pharmacology
  • Valproic Acid / therapeutic use
  • Xenopus
Citation (ISO format)
PICARD, Fabienne et al. Mutated nicotinic receptors responsible for autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy are more sensitive to carbamazepine. In: Epilepsia, 1999, vol. 40, n° 9, p. 1198–1209. doi: 10.1111/j.1528-1157.1999.tb00848.x
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Article (Published version)
accessLevelPublic
Identifiers
ISSN of the journal0013-9580
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38downloads

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