en
Scientific article
Review
English

Multifactorial effects of hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation on bone remodelling in type 2 diabetes mellitus

Published inCytokine & Growth Factor Reviews, vol. 55, p. 109-118
Publication date2020
Abstract

Bones undergo continuous cycles of bone remodelling that rely on the balance between bone formation and resorption. This balance allows the bone to adapt to changes in mechanical loads and repair microdamages. However, this balance is susceptible to upset in various conditions, leading to impaired bone remodelling and abnormal bones. This is usually indicated by abnormal bone mineral density (BMD), an indicator of bone strength. Despite this, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit normal to high BMD, yet still suffer from an increased risk of fractures. The activity of the bone cells is also altered as indicated by the reduced levels of bone turnover markers in T2DM observed in the circulation. The underlying mechanisms behind these skeletal outcomes in patients with T2DM remain unclear. This review summarises recent findings regarding inflammatory cytokine factors associated with T2DM to understand the mechanisms involved and considers potential therapeutic interventions.

Keywords
  • Diabetes
  • Hyperglycaemia
  • Hyperinsulinemia
  • Inflammation
  • Bones
  • Bone remodelling
Citation (ISO format)
SHAHEN, V.A. et al. Multifactorial effects of hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation on bone remodelling in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews, 2020, vol. 55, p. 109–118. doi: 10.1016/j.cytogfr.2020.04.001
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Article (Published version)
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Identifiers
ISSN of the journal1359-6101
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