en
Working paper
Open access
English

Can institutions shape immigration policy preferences? : the conditioning effects of labor market policy institutions on unemployment risks

ContributorsKayran, Elif Naz
Number of pages20
Publication date2019
Abstract

How do socio-economic inequalities in advanced post-industrial countries determine immigration policy preferences? To what extent labor market institutions condition the relationship between unemployment risks and immigration policy demands? I hypothesize that labor market institutions, namely compensation and protection regimes, significantly condition the positive relationship between unemployment risks and restrictiveness demands through their indirect effects. I apply multi-level estimations using the European Social Survey from 2002 to 2010 in 16 European countries. The findings reveal a significant job competition effect captured by workers' relative risk exposure associated with more restrictive immigration policy demands. Risk based attitudinal differences decrease with greater employment protection legislation. Only for workers with fixed contract, contexts with more expansive unemployment compensation policies increase the effect of relative unemployment risk. Overall, this paper contributes to the scholarly work on the determinants of political preferences in advanced post-industrial democracies.

Affiliation Not a UNIGE publication
Funding
  • European Commission - Unequal Democracies [741538]
Citation (ISO format)
KAYRAN, Elif Naz. Can institutions shape immigration policy preferences? : the conditioning effects of labor market policy institutions on unemployment risks. 2019
Main files (1)
Working paper
accessLevelPublic
Identifiers
  • PID : unige:134630
210views
46downloads

Technical informations

Creation04/03/2020 3:22:00 PM
First validation04/03/2020 3:22:00 PM
Update time03/15/2023 9:30:22 PM
Status update03/15/2023 9:30:22 PM
Last indexation01/17/2024 9:37:06 AM
All rights reserved by Archive ouverte UNIGE and the University of GenevaunigeBlack