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Scientific article
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English

Absence of an early hippocampal encoding signal after medial temporal lesions: No consequence for the spacing effect

Published inHippocampus, vol. 27, no. 7, p. 587-594
Publication date2019
Abstract

Immediately repeated meaningful pictures in a continuous recognition task induce a positive frontal potential at about 200-300 ms, which appears to emanate from the medial temporal lobe (MTL) centered on the hippocampus, as concluded from inverse solutions, coherence measurements, and depth electrode recordings in humans. In this study, we tested patients with unilateral MTL lesions due to stroke to verify the provenance of this signal and its association with the spacing effect (SE)-the improved learning of material encountered in spaced rather than massed presentation. We found that unilateral left or right MTL lesions abolished the early frontal MTL-mediated signal but not the spacing effect. We conclude that the SE does not depend on MTL integrity. We suggest that the early frontal signal at 200-300 ms after immediate picture repetition may serve as a direct biomarker of MTL integrity that may be useful in the early stages of diseases like Alzheimer's.

Keywords
  • Biomarker
  • Continuous recognition task
  • Evoked potentials
  • Hippocampus
  • Medial temporal
  • Lobe
  • Spacing effect
Citation (ISO format)
TAUTVYDAITE, Domile et al. Absence of an early hippocampal encoding signal after medial temporal lesions: No consequence for the spacing effect. In: Hippocampus, 2019, vol. 27, n° 7, p. 587–594. doi: 10.1002/hipo.23053
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Identifiers
ISSN of the journal1050-9631
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