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Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbon dioxide emissions: bottom–up estimates for the world as a whole and for major developing countries

Authors
Weiss, Martin
Neelis, Maarten
Blok, Kornelis
Published in Climatic Change. 2009, vol. 95, no. 3-4, p. 369-394
Abstract We present and apply a simple bottom–up model for estimating non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions.We apply this model for the year 2000: (1) to the world as a whole, (2) to the aggregate of Annex I countries and non-Annex I countries, and (3) to the ten non-Annex I countries with the highest consumption of fossil fuels for non-energy purposes. We find that worldwide non-energy use is equivalent to 1,670 ± 120 Mt (megatonnes) CO2 and leads to 700 ± 90 Mt CO2 emissions. Around 75% of non-energy use emissions is related to industrial processes. The remainder is attributed to the emission source categories of solvent and other product use, agriculture, and waste. Annex I countries account for 51% (360 ± 50 Mt CO2) and non-Annex I countries for 49% (340 ± 70 Mt CO2) of worldwide non-energy use emissions. Among non-Annex I countries, China is by far the largest emitter of non-energy use emissions (122 ± 18 Mt CO2). Our research deepens the understanding of non-energy use and related CO2 emissions in countries for which detailed emission inventories do not yet exist. Despite existing model uncertainties, we recommend NEAT-SIMP to inventory experts for preparing correct and complete non-energy use emission estimates for any country in the world.
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Article (Published version) (510 Kb) - document accessible for UNIGE members only Limited access to UNIGE
Other version: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10584-009-9562-x
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WEISS, Martin et al. Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbon dioxide emissions: bottom–up estimates for the world as a whole and for major developing countries. In: Climatic Change, 2009, vol. 95, n° 3-4, p. 369-394. https://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:42939

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Deposited on : 2014-12-09

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