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Scientific article
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English

High prognostic impact of flow cytometric minimal residual disease detection in acute myeloid leukemia: data from the HOVON/SAKK AML 42A study

Published inJournal of clinical oncology, vol. 31, no. 31, p. 3889-3897
Publication date2013
Abstract

Half the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who achieve complete remission (CR), ultimately relapse. Residual treatment-surviving leukemia is considered responsible for the outgrowth of AML. In many retrospective studies, detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) has been shown to enable identification of these poor-outcome patients by showing its independent prognostic impact. Most studies focus on molecular markers or analyze data in retrospect. This study establishes the value of immunophenotypically assessed MRD in the context of a multicenter clinical trial in adult AML with sample collection and analysis performed in a few specialized centers.

Keywords
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Consolidation Chemotherapy/methods
  • Female
  • Flow Cytometry/methods
  • Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage
  • Humans
  • Induction Chemotherapy/methods
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/diagnosis/drug therapy
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis
  • Neoplasm, Residual/diagnosis
  • Prognosis
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • Remission Induction
  • Young Adult
Citation (ISO format)
TERWIJN, Monique et al. High prognostic impact of flow cytometric minimal residual disease detection in acute myeloid leukemia: data from the HOVON/SAKK AML 42A study. In: Journal of clinical oncology, 2013, vol. 31, n° 31, p. 3889–3897. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2012.45.9628
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Article (Published version)
accessLevelPublic
Identifiers
ISSN of the journal0732-183X
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