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Title

Persistence of varicella-zoster virus-specific plasma cells in adult human bone marrow following childhood vaccination

Authors
Wieland, Andreas
Nasti, Tahseen H
Grifoni, Alba
Wilson, Elizabeth
Schmid, D Scott
Pulendran, Bali
Sette, Alessandro
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Published in Journal of virology. 2020, vol. 94, no. 13, p. e02127-19
Abstract Childhood immunization with the live-attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine induces protective immune responses. Routine VZV vaccination started only 2 decades ago, and thus, there are few studies examining the longevity of vaccine-induced immunity. Here, we analyzed the quantity of VZV-specific plasma cells (PCs) and CD4 T cells in the bone marrow (BM) of healthy young adults (n = 15) following childhood VZV immunization. Long-lived BM resident plasma cells constitutively secrete antibodies, and we detected VZV-specific PCs in the BM of all subjects. Anti-VZV plasma antibody titers correlated positively with the number of VZV-specific BM PCs. Furthermore, we quantified the number of interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-producing CD4 T cells specific for VZV glycoprotein E and all other structural and nonstructural VZV proteins in both BM and blood (peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]). The frequency of VZV-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells was significantly higher in PBMCs than BM. Our study shows that VZV-specific PCs and VZV-specific CD4 memory T cells persist up to 20 years after vaccination. These findings indicate that childhood VZV vaccination can elicit long-lived immune memory responses in the bone marrow.IMPORTANCE Childhood varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immunization induces immune memory responses that protect against primary VZV infection, chicken pox. In the United States, routine childhood VZV vaccination was introduced only 2 decades ago. Hence, there is limited information on the longevity of B and CD4 T cell memory, which are both important for protection. Here, we showed in 15 healthy young adults that VZV-specific B and CD4 T cell responses are detectable in bone marrow (BM) and blood up to 20 years after vaccination. Specifically, we measured antibody-secreting plasma cells in the BM and VZV-specific CD4 T cells in BM and blood. These findings suggest that childhood VZV vaccination induces long-lived immunity.
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PMID: 32321817
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Research group Centre de vaccinologie et d'immunologie néonatale (177)
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EBERHARDT, Christiane Sigrid et al. Persistence of varicella-zoster virus-specific plasma cells in adult human bone marrow following childhood vaccination. In: Journal of Virology, 2020, vol. 94, n° 13, p. e02127-19. doi: 10.1128/JVI.02127-19 https://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:143592

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Deposited on : 2020-10-28

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