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Oral nutritional supplements and taste preferences: 545 days of clinical testing in malnourished in-patients

Karsegard, Véronique L.
Nardo, Patrizia
Published in Clinical nutrition. 2008, vol. 27, no. 4, p. 660-5
Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Acceptability and intake of oral nutritional supplements are often suboptimal, partly because patients dislike flavour, texture or smell. We assessed the taste preferences about milk-based and fruit-juice typed supplements in malnourished in-patients. METHODS: One hundred and nine in-patients requiring oral nutritional support were assigned to consume four given supplements on four consecutive days, to answer a questionnaire based on a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) on acceptance/tolerance, and to choose their preferred product for the fifth day. RESULTS: Overall pleasantness was significantly better for milk-based supplements than for sweet and salty fruit-juice typed products (on VAS: 6.2+/-3.1 versus 4.4+/-3.9, p<0.01 and 3.5+/-3.4, p<0.0001, respectively, when 1 meant "not at all" and 10 "very much"), whereas digestive tolerance was comparable. When offered together on day 5, milk-based products were more frequently preferred (81.6%) than fruit-juice typed supplements (18.4%, p<0.001). Among milk-based products, vanilla, coffee and strawberry had comparable good results, whereas chocolate was less chosen and neutral never. For fruit-juice typed products, tomato obtained better results than orange or apple. CONCLUSIONS: Oral nutritional supplements are globally well-accepted and tolerated, but with variations according to categories and flavours that must be considered to improve compliance.
Keywords Administration, OralAnimalsDietary SupplementsFemaleFood Preferences/physiologyFood, Formulated/standardsFruitHumansMaleMiddle AgedMilkPatient ComplianceQuestionnairesTaste/physiology
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PMID: 18625541
Research group Nutrition clinique (597)
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