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Role of sialic acid and sulfate groups in cervical mucus physiological functions: study of Macaca radiata glycoproteins

Nasir ud, Din
Rungger-Brandle, Elisabeth
Hussain, S. A.
Walker-Nasir, Evelyne
Published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 2003, vol. 1623, no. 2-3, p. 53-61
Abstract The influence of charged groups in glycoproteins was investigated to assess their effect on the physiological functions of bonnet monkey cervical mucus. The macromolecular glycoproteins from peri-ovulatory, midcycle phase cervical mucus were treated with Pronase, trypsin and chymotrypsin and the enzyme-resistant glycoproteins purified by gel filtration on Sepharose 4B and a high molecular weight component containing carbohydrates, proteins and sulfate groups was recovered in high yield. This material still reacted with an antiserum directed against purified midcycle glycoprotein but not against another antiserum directed against luteal phase purified glycoproteins. Upon treatment with Pronase, trypsin and chymotrypsin, asialoglycoproteins and desulfated asialoglycoproteins released fragments of low molecular sizes, none of which reacted with the anti-midcycle glycoprotein antiserum. Cervical mucus collected from the estrogenic phase displayed a morphology supporting sperm migration, and this mucus retains the same morphology and reacts with the anti-midcycle glycoprotein antiserum following mild treatment with sialidase and subsequently with Pronase. These results imply that charged carbohydrate groups help maintain the structural and functional integrity of the mucus glycoprotein in its biological environment.
Keywords AnimalsAsialoglycoproteins/chemistry/isolation & purificationCervix Mucus/ chemistry/ physiologyEndopeptidasesFemaleGlycoproteins/chemistry/isolation & purification/physiologyMacaca radiata/ physiologyN-Acetylneuraminic Acid/chemistryOvulationPrecipitin TestsSulfates/chemistry
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PMID: 14572902
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