Scientific Article
previous document  unige:10654  next document
add to browser collection
Title

Molecular factors influencing retention on immobilized artifical membranes (IAM) compared to partitioning in liposomes and n-octanol

Authors
Taillardat-Bertschinger, Agnès
Martinet, C. A.
Reist, Marianne
Caron, Giulia
Fruttero, Roberta
Testa, Bernard
Published in Pharmaceutical Research. 2002, vol. 19, no. 6, p. 729-737
Abstract PURPOSE: To assess the effect of molecular factors influencing retention on immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) high-performance liquid chromatography columns compared to liposomal partitioning and traditional n-octanol/water partition coefficients. METHODS: IAM capacity factors were measured at pH 7.0 on an IAM.PC.DD2 stationary phase. Liposomal partitioning at pH 7.0 and n-octanol/water partition coefficients were measured using the pH metric method. Partitioning in egg-phosphatidylcholine (PhC) liposomes was also measured by equilibrium dialysis for a series of beta-blockers. RESULTS: For the ionized beta-blockers, potentiometry and equilibrium dialysis yielded consistent partitioning data. For relatively large bases. IAM retention correlated well with PhC liposome partitioning, hydrophobic forces being mainly involved. For more hydrophilic compounds and for heterogeneous solutes, in contrast, the balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions was not the same in the two systems. Hydrogen bonding, an important factor in liposomes partitioning, played only a minor role in IAM retention. CONCLUSIONS: Partitioning in immobilized artificial membranes depends on size, hydrophobicity, and charge. When hydrophobic interactions dominate retention, IAM capacity factors are well correlated with liposomal partitioning. On the contary, for hydrophilic solutes, the two systems do not yield the same information and are not interchangeable.
Keywords Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methodsHydrophobicityLiposomes/*chemistryMembranes, Artificial
Stable URL http://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:10654
Full text
Identifiers
PMID: 12134941
98 hits and 0 download since 2010-08-06
Update
Export document
Format :
Citation style :