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Title

Regional heat flows of resting and exercising men immersed in cool water

Authors
Veicsteinas, Arsenio
Rennie, D. W.
Published in Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental & Exercise Physiology. 1988, vol. 64, no. 3, p. 1239-1248
Abstract Trunk (HT), limb (HL), and whole-body (HDIR = HT + HL + Hforehead) skin-to-water heat flows were measured by heat flow transducers on nine men immersed head out in water at critical temperature (TCW = 30 +/- 2 degrees C) and below [overall water temperature (TW) range = 22-32 degrees C] after up to 3 h at rest and exercise. Body heat flow was also determined indirectly (HM) from metabolic rate corrected for changes in heat stores. At rest at TCW [O2 uptake (VO2) = 0.33 +/- 0.07 l/min, n = 7], HT = 52.3 +/- 14.2 (SD) W, HL = 56.4 +/- 14.6 W, HDIR = 120 +/- 27 W, and HM = 111 +/- 29 W (significantly different from HDIR). TW markedly affected HDIR but only slightly affected HM (n = 22 experiments at TW different from TCW plus 7 experiments at TCW). During light exercise (3 MET) at TCW (VO2 = 1.06 +/- 0.26 l/min, n = 9), HT = 122 +/- 43 W, HL = 130 +/- 27 W, HDIR = 285 +/- 69 W, and HM = 260 +/- 60 W. During severe exercise (7 MET) at TCW (VO2 = 2.27 +/- 0.50 l/min, n = 4), HT = 226 +/- 100 W, HL = 262 +/- 61 W, HDIR = 517 +/- 148 W, and HM = 496 +/- 98 W. Lowering TW at 7-MET exercise (n = 9, plus 4 at TCW) had no effect on HDIR and HM. In conclusion, resting HL and HT are equal. At TW less than TCW at rest, HDIR greater than HM, showing that unexpectedly the shell was still cooling. During exercise, HL increases more than HT but less than expected from the heat production of the working limbs. Therefore some heat produced by the limbs is probably transported by blood to the trunk. During heavy exercise, HDIR is constant at all considered TW; apparently it is regulated by some thermally dependent mechanism, such as a progressive cutaneous vasodilation occurring as TW increases.
Keywords Body Temperature RegulationHumansMalePhysical ExertionRestTemperatureTime FactorsWater
Stable URL http://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/unige:10268
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Other version: http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/64/3/1239.pdf
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PMID: 3366739
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